Yacht's the Good Word

Taking a cue from business baron Vijay Mallya, who owns the 95-metre Indian Empress, many among the Indian elite have decided to splurge on yachts over the last five years.
     Print Edition: Sep 15, 2013

Taking a cue from business baron Vijay Mallya, who owns the 95-metre Indian Empress, many among the Indian elite have decided to splurge on yachts over the last five years. In fact, as many as 200 yachts have been sold in the country during this period. Some tips on yacht-anchoring etiquette.

COMING IN
Entering an anchorage or a mooring area is a lot like moving into a new neighbourhood. Even if there's no particular stipulation to do so, enter at a speed that's less than five knots. This will ensure that you do not rock the other boats, annoying their occupants.

POSITION IT RIGHT

Try to position your yacht in a place that's least likely to come in the path of other boats - even if it amounts to a certain degree of inconvenience. Also, keep away from potential party boats (you never know what they have been drinking), or ones that have noisy wind generators. Believe us, the last thing you need is a nasty bump on your yacht.

DON'T BE A BOAT MAGNET
For some reason, an already-anchored yacht always seems to make other boats park right next to it -- even if there is an enormous bay stretching out. Try not to follow this trend, and if you have anchored first, politely ask the next boat to give you some space.

BUOY YOUR ANCHOR

In a crowded anchorage, it's a good idea to place a floating marker on your anchor so that everybody knows where it is. There's nothing worse than tangled anchors, particularly when you have to make a hasty departure.

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