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Remembrance of times past

     Print Edition: Jan 20, 2013

Business Today was launched in January 1992, soon after Ratan Tata became the helmsman of the Tata Group. Indeed, the first issue featured Ratan Tata on the cover. A collage of BT's reportage on Tata over the years.

In 1992 BT asked the question
"Can Tatas Grab the 90s"?
The story summed up Ratan Tata's challenges. This was much before Ratan Tata eased out the Tata satraps - Russi Mody of Tata Steel, Darbari Seth of Tata Chemicals and Ajit Kerkar of Indian Hotels - with a new retirement policy.

In 1998, in its sixth anniversary issue Business Today asked the question

"Can Tata Survive?"
The story concluded that "The Tata Group's businesses will survive, and flourish, in spite of - and not because of - the Tata family."

In its March 31, 2002 issue BT took another comprehensive look at the Tatas and headlined the story
"Tata Transformed" In an interview Ratan Tata said: "…I wanted our companies to be led by people in their 40s, and that could also hold for the chairman of the group. That would be something I would be happy to see." In 2012, Tata finally got a successor in his fifties to head the Group - Cyrus Mistry.

The big bang acquisitions came in the 2000s.
The Tata buyout of Tetley, Corus and Jaguar-Land Rover changed the way Indian business was looked upon globally. BT covered the developments extensively.

In a 2004 interview Tata spoke about the group's plans.
"I think we have to look at acquisitions and JVs as the two ways to go in steel and for that matter in automotive and auto components. As far as companies like TCS are concerned, again acquisitions and increasing entities in those countries that have the face of that country will be needed."

The big bang acquisitions came in the 2000s

The Tata buyout of Tetley, Corus and Jaguar-Land Rover changed the way Indian business was looked upon globally. BT covered the developments extensively

Under Ratan Tata's stewardship, the Group made history by launching Indica in 1998, the country's first indigenously developed car, and the Nano in 2008, the world's cheapest some cutting-edge analysis.

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