Business Today

Turnaround Man

Ramchandran achieved the turnaround in attrition levels by rationalising non-salary expenses, creating a flat organisation without hierarchies, and linking remuneration to merit.
twitter-logo Goutam Das        Print Edition: Mar 16, 2014
Chintu Neil Ramchandran, 39 CEO, Capco India
Chintu Neil Ramchandran, 39 CEO, Capco India Photo: Nilotpal Baruah/www.indiatodayimages.com

Chintu Neil Ramchandran turned around a dying company in India in less than two years. He quit Accenture and joined US-based MNC Capco in September 2011.

On his second day in the office, he received a mail asking if the company, which does technology consulting work for the financial services industry, should shut down its loss-making Indian operation. "Capco had 70 people then and an attrition rate in high double digits. The entire senior management had walked out and drained the company of expertise in niche technologies," says Ramchandran. Naturally, he opposed closure.

By the end of 2013, Capco had 320 people with the attrition rate down to eight-to-12 per cent. And for the first time in its 10-year operations in India, Capco had started making profits. Ramchandran achieved the turnaround by rationalising non-salary expenses, creating a flat organisation without hierarchies, and linking remuneration to merit. "I believe in being paid well, paying well and empowering the junior staff."

Chintu Neil Ramchandran, 39 CEO, Capco India

THE MBA DEGREE
It helped me to develop the ability to deconstruct complex issues into simpler parts and then find solutions for them

FIRST BIG BREAK
Moving to the consulting industry by joining a major UK firm

FIRST FAILURE
Trying to reason with my German Shepherd at the age of four. I still have the bite marks as a reminder of who the more effective negotiator was

SKILL ACQUIRED

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