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From the Editor-in-Chief

One trend that clearly emerged through the 26 issues of the magazine is that Indians are getting more prosperous but also more insecure, and almost at the same rate. At the heart of this paradox lies financial illiteracy.

Aroon Purie        Print Edition: November 1, 2007

Aroon PurieIn the first issue of MONEY TODAY, exactly one year ago, I confessed that the idea of this magazine was born out of a personal need — for credible and simple advice on investment. I am delighted to know that my need is the need of every urban Indian earning and living well.

One trend that clearly emerged through the 26 issues of the magazine is that Indians are getting more prosperous but also more insecure, and almost at the same rate. At the heart of this paradox lies financial illiteracy. No amount of wealth can be transformed into life-long security without financial literacy. I am glad that we have already helped hundreds of families resolve this paradox (read the experience of six families in this issue).

MONEY TODAY is a unique publication of our group in two ways. Its content is the most interactive. There are at least four sections in the magazine that are based on direct and multiple interactions with our readers. The kind of financial details readers have shared with us aren’t usually shared even with family members. I thank you for your unstinting faith. On our part we have tried to live up to your expectations — and even exceed them — by adopting one simple principle: change the reader and change with the reader.

Every single section of the magazine has been modified through the year to cater you better. Another unique feature of MONEY TODAY is the long shelf life of its stories. For instance, our first cover story 'Golden Rules of Stock Investing' is as relevant and insightful today as it was in October 2006.

Through our website we will ensure that you get easy and complete access to our timeless content, well after the magazine has moved out of the newsstands. But as we evolve new and better ways of reaching you, one thing will not change: India Today Group's commitment to simplify the complicated through great writing, research and visuals.

I had made another observation in the launch issue — that banks, brokers and financial advisers often have vested interests in selling certain products. Unfortunately, this too has been validated in MONEY TODAY. Mis-selling of investment schemes is causing investor losses that’s more than the combined losses incurred in all financial scams.

Knowing how to invest right is good, but not good enough. Knowing what to do when you have been tricked into making a bad investment is equally important. That’s why we decided to dedicate the cover story of this special anniversary issue to financial rights. After researching hundreds of court verdicts and case studies and going over expert opinions to map the state of financial consumerism in the country, we present a charter of rights and duties that is "of the investor, by the investor and for the investor".

Remember, knowledge is wealth. And that’s what we offer you. To make you richer.

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