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Apple Watch used to stabilise premature baby born on Hawaii-bound flight

A woman, who goes by the name Lavinia Mounga, was unaware of her pregnancy and gave birth to a baby on a flight.

twitter-logoAnkita Chakravarti | May 7, 2021 | Updated 10:15 IST

Highlights

  • Apple Watch has saved the lives of its users many times, but the latest heroic tale of the smartwatch will warm your heart.
  • The baby was born 11 weeks early to a woman who was unaware of her pregnancy.
  • Apple Watch was used by the doctor to stablise the heart rate of the baby.

Apple Watch has saved the lives of its users many times, but the latest heroic tale of the smartwatch will warm your heart. A baby was born prematurely on a flight bound to Hawaii. The doctors and nurses present in the flight had nothing except the on-flight items to stabilize the heart rate of the baby. And what better than an Apple Watch to do so. The smartwatches that Apple makes are expensive but the wonders it can do makes up for the exorbitant pricing.

A woman, who goes by the name Lavinia Mounga, boarded a Delta flight from Salt Lake City, Utah, to Honolulu, Hawaii on April 28. She was unaware about her pregnancy and gave birth to a baby on the flight who was born 11 weeks early. "I just didn't know I was pregnant. This guy just came out of nowhere," she told KHON 2. "Just happy he's here, and he's doing well," the new mom said.

The baby and the mother were fortunate because there was a doctor and three nurses from the North Kansas City Hospital on the same flight, who worked hard to keep the baby stable using the items available on the flight.

One of the nurses spotted the woman with a baby near the toilet. She said, "I went back there first, and she is holding a baby, underneath the toilet almost. And so I'm yelling, 'Mimi! There's a baby, and it's little!" NICU Nurse Lani Bamfield told the daily.

Dale Glenn, who was a family physician at Straub Medical Center, told the daily that he had dealt with in-flight emergencies before but nothing like childbirth had taken place ever. "Usually they're pretty clear, you know, 'Is there a doctor on board?' This call was not like this. This call was 'Medical help!.I don't know how a patient gets so lucky as to have three neonatal intensive care nurses on board the same flight when she is in emergency labor, but that was a situation we were in," Glenn said.

When the baby was born, there were still three hours remaining until the plane landed. The doctor and the team of nurses had to stabilize the baby with whatever little they in the flight

"None of the equipment we have was suitable for a premature baby, and this baby was born at 29 weeks instead of the normal 40 weeks, right? So we made baby warmers out of bottles that were microwaved. We used an Apple Watch to measure the heart rate," Glenn told Khon 2.

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