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UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson accidentally reveals Zoom ID for Cabinet meeting on Twitter, sparks security concerns

Prime Minister of UK Boris Johnson, who was tested positive for COVID-19, conducted his first-ever digital cabinet meeting on Zoom and shared a screenshot of the same on Twitter.

twitter-logoAnkita Chakravarti | April 1, 2020 | Updated 13:30 IST

Highlights

  • Johnson revealed the Zoom ID for the cabinet meeting on Twitter
  • Along with the ID, the usernames of some of the cabinet ministers were also listed down the side.
  • The Twitter users were quick to point out that the leader has accidentally revealed the Zoom Meeting ID.

Prime Minister of UK Boris Johnson, who was tested positive for COVID-19, conducted his first-ever digital cabinet meeting on Zoom and shared a screenshot of the same on Twitter. But along with it, he also revealed some details that he shouldn't have. To name one, Johnson revealed the Zoom ID for the cabinet meeting, which he failed to exclude from the screenshot. Along with the ID, the usernames of some of the cabinet ministers were also listed down the side.

Boris shared the screenshot on Twitter and wrote, "This morning I chaired the first-ever digital Cabinet. Our message to the public is: stay at home, protect the NHS, save lives. #StayHomeSaveLives." The Twitter users were quick to point out that the leader has accidentally revealed the Zoom Meeting ID and shared the usernames of some ministers as well.

It was being reported that after figuring out the meeting ID, many people attempted to crash into the meeting but Downing Street assured that it was password protected. However, a cybersecurity expert revealed that showing meeting details broke a key rule about security.

"Video conferencing helps people stay connected by being able to speak to each other, see each other, and share text and files. Like any other technology, however, video conferencing has security risks that must be considered. No matter who you are, publishing information to the world must be done carefully. Boris Johnson's Twitter post reveals a Zoom meeting ID and what appears to be one or two personal IDs that might correspond to email addresses, " metro.co.uk quoted Jonathan Knudsen, senior security strategist at Synopsys as saying.

Now with almost everybody using Zoom to meet their professional commitments, Zoom bombing is becoming increasingly common. It basically is a scenario when an uninvited guest obtains your meeting ID, crashes your meeting and starts doing inappropriate activities. Although Boris Johnson shared his meeting iD on a platform like Twitter, his IT experts had at least secured it with a password. So in Johnson's case, the chances of Zoom bombing happening were very low.

Since most people are now working from home and using Zoom to get their professional work done, what are the ways in which one could prevent his Zoom meeting ID from Zoom bombing? Here are some points that were listed out on Zoom's blog.

1) Only allow guests who have invited to chat with on Zoom
2) Lock your meeting once all the guests have arrived and if anyone shows up late, make him wait in Zoom's waiting list. Meanwhile, you can also check out their profiles.
3) Secure your meeting with an email ID and ask your Zoom invitees to log in through the email ID that you had sent them. Do not entertain unknown guests.

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