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Aligning abilities

Experiential learning can be a huge differentiator in the course of one’s career.

Experiential learning can be a huge differentiator in the course of one’s career. Author Aldous Huxley had observed, “Experience is not what happens to you. It is what you do with what happens to you.”

Singh invested two decades of his life in the cauldron of creativity spanning roles from graphic designer, visualiser and art director to creative director.

A key learning has been the recognition that he must align what he does to growing the client’s business, and the importance of building long-term relationships with clients. It is no surprise that a client opted for him.

Interestingly while the prescribed mode is to be as objective as feasible, both career and hiring decisions tend to be intuitive and invariably specific to the individual concerned and the subjective context. Singh’s career choices and his client’s own choice to pick him reflect a basic belief that experiential learning matters; that nuances acquired and insights gained can be deployed to mutual benefit.

Serving a client as one would serve oneself is a paying proposition indeed. Trust and friendship get cemented over time, and that’s a reward in itself.

When we recognise what drives us, we choose those careers which align our natural abilities and limitations and deploy them to productive gain. As Tolstoy observed, the significance of how “one can live magnificently in this world, if one knows how to work and how to love, to work for the person one loves and to love one’s work”.

By N S Rajan, Partner, Human Capital, E&Y