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Readers' vews on Busienss Today stories

Your cover story (King B, October 16) highlights Kumar Mangalam Birla's vision and journey. He gambled with ideas, strategies and dared to dream of a global setup different from the typical Birla style.

King or Leader?
Your cover story (King B, October 16) highlights Kumar Mangalam Birla's vision and journey. He gambled with ideas, strategies and dared to dream of a global setup different from the typical Birla style. He tinkered with the business model of his father's company, Aditya Birla Group, and was successful in growing it about 20 times. He was successful in balancing some traditional systems like Parta alongside modern concepts such as innovative management style and his ability to "carry and marry" both worlds. I feel he is a great leader in many ways, rather a real king.
Bithi Dutta, Puducherry

Green Mystery
The Great Indian Green Trick (BT, October 16) was a brilliant analysis. Sordid environmental issues were exposed through a deep study of Krishnapatnam and other areas in Andhra Pradesh. They are not isolated cases. This is a pervasive mess across the nation. New business initiatives should not hamper the lives of breadwinners and their dependants with problems that roll out when ventures are allowed to unfold without proper environmental norms. Environmental hazards are offsetting the benevolence of the accrued augmentation of industrial expansion.
B. Rajasekaran, Bangalore

Cooking with Gas
Fuel's gold (BT, October 16) is novel gold. The cooking technology developed by First Energy is a great initiative that will address two major problems - waste management and the energy problem of low-income households. It will save both energy and money. In fact, the Thiruvananthapuram civic body faced similar problems and is thinking of promoting this technology in a big way. Some households in Thiruvananthapuram are already recycling their daily waste and are using it as cooking fuel.
Jacob Sahayam, Thiruvananthapuram

Correction
In the PeopleBusiness item on Divya Narendra (BT, October 16), the first start-up he worked on has been incorrectly named. It was called HarvardConnection. We regret the error.