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Twitter cracks down on 'copypasta' tweets, limits their visibility

Twitter has decided to hide tweets that contain text that has been copy and pasted without any modifications from the source text. This would help in stopping the spread of false information by multiple non-verified/ fake accounts

twitter-logoBusinessToday.In | August 29, 2020 | Updated 18:38 IST
Twitter cracks down on 'copypasta' tweets, limits their visibility
Twitter has decided to hide copypasta tweets

Twitter has taken a major step to combat dissemination of propaganda on its platform. It has decided to hide tweets that contain text that has been copy and pasted without any modifications from the source text. This would help in stopping the spread of false information by multiple non-verified/ fake accounts.

Twitter is attempting to halt the practice of 'copypasta' which is internet slang used for text that has been copied, pasted and tweeted by multiple accounts at the same time. Copypasta is used by supporters of a party or movement to share the same piece of information via several accounts.  

"We've seen an increase in "copypasta," an attempt by many accounts to copy, paste, and Tweet the same phrase," Twitter said in a tweet on August 28. "When we see this behaviour, we may limit the visibility of the Tweets," it said.

This means that any group of people who indulge in copypasta will experience that their Twitter is actively hiding their copypasta tweets from the general public. Copypasta tweets will not appear on Twitter feeds of people. This is part of Twitter's recent efforts to curb the spread of fake news ahead of the 2020 US Presidential Election which is scheduled to be held on November 3.  

Recently, Twitter had added another feature to their mobile app which would allow users to lock their tweets so that no other user can copy their tweet. Earlier, the company had also launched the 'Retweet with quote' feature on their mobile app.  

Copypasta tweets are mostly used for spamming purposes using thousands of fake accounts. Thousands on tweets with the same hashtags are posted on the site at the same time. The hashtags then start to trend on social media which creates the public perception that many people are talking about a particular issue. This technique is often utilised by groups of people to defame a particular individual or organisation. 

Also Read: Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey says he does not use any Facebook product

Also Read: NEET-JEE exam: Students demanding postponement of exams take over Twitter in protest

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