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App developer claims Apple hosts fake streaming apps on App Store, makes money out of them

App developer claims Apple hosts fake streaming apps on App Store, makes money out of them

In a series of tweets, app developer Kosta Eleftheriou explained how Apple's App Store is home to fake streaming apps that house pirated movies.

Story highlights
  • Apple has a series of illegal moving streaming services on App Store.
  • developer Kosta Eleftheriou’s latest findings reveal that the App Store houses some streaming apps with pirated movies.
  • Apple has acknowledged the findings of Eleftheriou and has reportedly removed all the illegal apps discovered by him. 

Apple has a series of illegal moving streaming services on the App Store. Apple critic and developer Kosta Eleftheriou's latest findings reveal that the App Store houses some streaming apps with pirated movies. He revealed in his tweets that the apps claim to be legitimate services, they use movie trailers and photo filters to fool users. Eleftheriou has claimed that these apps had garnered more than 2 million installs and are generating a lot of revenue.

In a series of tweets, app developer Kosta Eleftheriou explained how Apple's App Store is home to fake streaming apps that house pirated movies. He revealed that the app encourages users to enter codes or share the app to unlock more features. The fake streaming apps also have premium subscription plans that are processed through Apple Pay. Apple apparently takes a 15-30 percent cut from the in-app purchases. He went on to add that the apps are available on the App Store despite being labelled as illegal in the reviews section. All the apps pretend to be something else.

Eleftheriou revealed that there are a lot of ads on social media promoting the website, including ads from influencers with *millions* of followers. "While Apple is failing to police its App Store, these apps have amassed over 2M downloads and are now generating ~$16,000/day, or about $6M per year. Of course, Apple takes their 15-30% cut from all this, while @Netflix & others lose out," he wrote.

The app developer had claimed that Apple had copied his Apple Watch app called Flicktype. He had dragged the company to court for the same.

Apple has acknowledged the findings of Eleftheriou and has reportedly removed all the illegal apps discovered by him.

Apple's own Eric Friedman, head of the Fraud Engineering Algorithms and Risk [FEAR] unit had dug up dirt on Apple's security policies. He had called it akin to "bringing a plastic knife to a gunfight." Friedman had said that the App Store review process is "more like the pretty lady who greets you at the Hawaiian airport than the drug-sniffing dog."