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After 1962 reminder, now Chinese media wants India to learn international politics

While both the countries are yet to reach on some kind of understanding, state-run Global Times has issued several warnings to India, asking it to withdraw from the region or be kicked out.

Saurabh Sharma | August 9, 2017 | Updated 15:16 IST
After 1962 reminder, now Chinese media wants India to learn international politics

It's been over a month and a half since India and China have been locked in a face off over Doklam region in Sikkim sector. Even as India is ready for diplomatic talks on the crisis, China refuses to engage with New Delhi unless its conditions are met on the border.

While both the countries are yet to reach on some kind of understanding, state-run Global Times has issued several warnings to India, asking it to withdraw from the region or be kicked out.

In an editorial commentary, the Chinese daily said that India's analysis on Doklam issue was unrealistic. It said: "If New Delhi really keeps the faith that China will not take military action under any circumstances, then its analysis is not based on the principles of international politics and military science."

Here are some of the repeated threats that state-guided Global Times has issued through its daily editorial.

Military Threat: The Global Times carried an article on August 4 in which it said: "China will not allow the military standoff between China and India in Doklam to last for too long, and there may be a small-scale military operation to expel Indian troops within two weeks."

READ ALSO:History proves threats don't work: Why India-China should focus on trade not tirade

It wasn't the first incident of open military threat. Almost two weeks ago on July 21, it had published a similar threat saying, "If Indian troops continue trespassing into China's territory, what Beijing may do next is to get prepared for a military confrontation and resolve the conflict through non-diplomatic means."

It further wrote: "That the later India withdraws troops, the greater the risk that it will face from a military counteraction and the more clout it will lose politically. China's military pressure on India will increase every day and India will end up losing face and be totally disgraced."

Remember 1962: Ever since the latest stand-off broke out, the Chinese press has in multiple editorial pieces referred to 1962 war saying India hasn't learn any lesson from it. However, Defence Minister Arun Jaitley has reminded Beijing that India of 2017 is different from that of 1962.

READ ALSO:Don't bank on US and Japan, you'll lose: Chinese daily warns India over Doklam standoff

In an article published on August 7, Global Times said: "If New Delhi thinks that China will not take military action under any circumstances, then its analysis is not based on the principles of international politics and military science." It further said that even former Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru back in 1962 believed China would not strike back.

"However, the Nehru government underestimated the determination of the Chinese government to safeguard China's territorial integrity," it said adding that fifty-five years have passed, but the Indian government is as naive as it ever was. The lessons of the 1962 war didn't last for half a century, Global Times said.


Playing trade as a tool:
Global Times recently claimed that Myanmar is unlikely to support India's stand on the tensions in the border area, as that would risk cutting its economic ties with China. It was an indirect threat to Myanmar that if it goes with India, China could retaliate economically. Not only Myanmar, China is also considering taking other South Asian countries along to circle India.


READ ALSO:Ban Chinese goods: Can India do to China what China does to other countries?

The Chinese mouthpiece elaborated what it wants from the South Asian neighbours. It said: "China should keep a close eye on economic cooperation with some South Asian countries like Bangladesh to promote economic integration. This could promote the formation of a string of active economic development zones surrounding India, which would not be a bad thing if it could place pressure on New Delhi to deepen its economic cooperation with neighbouring countries."

In another editorial, it had also claimed that India has more in common with China than with the United States. Explaining the argument, it said: "India is thirsty for manufacturing - especially after PM Modi's 'Make in India initiative' - investment. However, with Trump's efforts to bring manufacturing back to the US, China is one of India's few options for ideal investment sources." 

Be wary of international support: State-guided Global Times has termed international support to India's position on current stand-off as 'illusory'. The editorial targeted Indian External Minister Sushma Swaraj who had assured the Parliament that other major countries were in support of India.

It said: "India should by no means count on support from the US and Japan because their support is illusory. If India fancies the idea that it has a strategic card to play in the Indian Ocean, it could not be even more naive. China does hold a lot of cards and can hit India's Achilles heel, but India has no leverage at all to have a strategic showdown with China."   


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