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How governments across the world are reacting to TikTok ban

On June 29, 2020, India invoked power under section 69A of IT Act to ban apps including TikTok that were believed to be engaged in activities prejudicial to sovereignty and integrity of India, defence of India, the security of the state and public order

twitter-logoNidhi Singal | August 20, 2020 | Updated 10:11 IST
How governments across the world are reacting to TikTok ban

Since the Indian government banned TikTok and over 100 other Chinese apps amid raging concerns about the data security and to safeguard the privacy of 130 crore Indians, governments around the world have started deliberations over the use of these apps in their respective countries.

On June 29, 2020, India invoked power under section 69A of IT Act to ban apps including TikTok that were believed to be engaged in activities prejudicial to sovereignty and integrity of India, defence of India, the security of the state and public order. The Ministry of Information Technology had received many complaints from various sources including several reports about the misuse of some mobile apps available on Android and iOS platforms for stealing and surreptitiously transmitting users' data in an unauthorised manner.

Since the TikTok ban in India, US President Donald Trump has also been vocal about banning the app. On Thursday, Trump signed an Executive Order prohibiting TikTok from operating in the US in 45 days, since the order issue date. The order would prohibit any transaction by any person, or with respect to any property, subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, with ByteDance Ltd. The apps developed and owned by the company in the People's Republic of China (China) threaten the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States, additional steps must be taken to deal with the national emergency with respect to the information and communications technology and services supply chain, said the Executive Order.

However, a news article by Reuters highlights that Australia has found no evidence showing it should restrict the popular short-video app. Even before the US President Donald Trump issued an executive order to prohibit TikTok, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said that at the moment there is nothing that suggests security interests are being compromised or Australian citizens are being compromised. However, being a Chinese app, citizens should exercise their own judgment on whether to use the app or not. Similarly, the government of the Philippines says it does not see any reason to ban Chinese video-sharing app TikTok in the country.

Meanwhile, Microsoft held discussions on potential TikTok purchase in the United States.  While the preliminary proposal was to explore a purchase of the TikTok service in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, recent developments suggest Microsoft may take over TikTok's entire global business. This includes TikTok's India operations.

Also Read: Xiaomi's new MIUI version to remove pre-installed blocked apps

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