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Human lifespan up to 150 years! New study focuses on pace of ageing

Human lifespan up to 150 years! New study focuses on pace of ageing

Singapore-based biotech company Gero's researchers, in a paper published in the journal Nature Communication, mentioned an underlying 'pace of ageing' that sets the lifespan between 120-150 years

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A group of researchers from Singapore are busy finding out  the upper limit of human lifespan.

Singapore-based biotech company Gero's researchers, in a paper published in the journal Nature Communication, mentioned an underlying 'pace of ageing' that sets the lifespan between 120-150 years.

The paper titled 'Longitudinal analysis of blood markers reveals progressive loss of resilience and predicts human lifespan limit,' says that death is an essential biological property, independent of stress factors.

The researchers to assess this evolution looked at health data for large groups from the US, the UK and Russia and observed changes in blood cell counts and the daily number of steps taken by people.

"Ageing in humans exhibits universal features common to complex systems operating on the brink of disintegration," said the researchers.

The team of researchers, led by Timothy V Pyrkov, observed that as age increases, the factors beyond disease drove an incremental and predictable decline in the human body's ability to return blood cells.

They also found that the pace of decline determined that when resilience will completely disappear at the age of 120 to 150 years, leading to death.

Peter Fedichev, Study's co-author and founder of Gero, said "although most biologists would view blood cell counts and step counts as pretty different, the fact that both sources paint exactly the same future suggests that this pace-of-ageing component is real," reports Scientific American.

The interesting fact that the research included is that resilience starts declining somewhere in the mid-thirties to mid-forties with the body slowly losing the ability to cope and recover from stress.

"This work explains why even the most effective prevention and treatment of age-related diseases could only improve the average but not the maximal lifespan unless true anti-ageing therapies have been developed," said Andrei Gudkov, US-based co-author, from the Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Experts also believe that the research could lead to the development of drugs to extend healthspan as recovery rate is an important sign of ageing. France's Jeanne Calment was recorded as the oldest person to have ever lived and died at the age of 122.

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