Business Today
Loading...

India-China standoff near Ladakh may not be over yet; here's why

India and China are conducting confidence-building measures before beginning Major General-level talks that are likely to start on Wednesday (June 10)

twitter-logo BusinessToday.In        Last Updated: June 10, 2020  | 17:03 IST
India-China standoff near Ladakh may not be over yet; here's why
The India-China border dispute covers the 3,488-km-long line of actual control (LAC)

India is still concerned over continued Chinese military deployment in rear positions near Ladakh despite its disengagement at three locations in the union territory (UT).

Army personnel from both sides (India and China) have disengaged from Galwan valley area (Patrolling Point 14), Patrolling point 15, and Hot Springs (Patrolling Point 17) in Eastern Ladakh area by 2-2.5 kilometres.

"Heavy Chinese deployment, including 10,000 troops in the rear positions along with their heavy artillery, tank regiments, and fighter bomber squadrons is the main matter of concern. This build-up has to end and troops have to be de-inducted by the People's Liberation Army (PLA) to end the tensions on the Line of Actual Control (LAC)," senior government sources told India Today TV.

Also Read: India-China row: Chinese fighters fly close to Ladakh, India keeps a close eye

The sources added that although Chinese troops have disengaged and soldiers on the Indian side were also retreating from three areas, tensions still prevail and will end only once de-induction starts. They further stated that the Chinese build-up in its rear areas with tanks and artillery remained intact with no signs of de-escalation.

Officials said the issue would be brought up at senior-level military talks between the two countries, slated to take place in the next 10 days.

India and China are conducting confidence-building measures before beginning Major General-level talks that are likely to start on Wednesday (June 10). Other talks at ground locations will also take place shortly.

Since the standoff that began between India and China in the first week of May (last month), followed by a violent clash in Pangong Tso lake, both the countries have been looking to find a solution to the ongoing dispute in Eastern Ladakh.

Also Read: Eastern Ladakh border dispute: Indian, Chinese armies to resolve issue through talks

The trigger for the face-off was China's stiff opposition to India laying a key road in the Finger area around the Pangong Tso Lake besides construction of another route connecting the Darbuk-Shayok-Daulat Beg Oldie road in Galwan Valley.

During their military-level talks on June 6, India and China agreed to follow the broad decisions taken by their leaders in the Wuhan summit in 2018 to ensure peace and tranquillity along the Line of Actual Control (LAC).

On June 6, Lt General Harinder Singh, the general officer commanding of Leh-based 14 Corps, and Commander of the Tibet Military District Maj Gen Liu Lin held an extensive meeting.

The India-China border dispute covers the 3,488-km-long LAC. China claims Arunachal Pradesh as part of southern Tibet while India contests it.

Also Read: China deceives India in Ladakh; mobilises forces on mud trucks

Youtube
  • Print

  • COMMENT
BT-Story-Page-B.gif
A    A   A
close