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'Committed to take back as much as we can': Dell bets big on recycling

"We are committed to taking back as much used electronics as we can in line with our goal to reuse or recycle an equivalent product for each one sold," said Indrajit Belgundi, Senior Director and General Manager, Client Solutions

twitter-logoNidhi Singal | May 21, 2021 | Updated 17:09 IST
‘Committed to take back as much as we can’: Dell bets big on recycling
Dell Technologies has gone all-in on its commitment to sustainability

Committed to the environment, Dell Technologies has gone all-in on its commitment to sustainability. The company has been recovering used electronics since 2007 and is constantly refurbishing and reusing key parts to ensure devices stay out of the landfill.

"We are committed to taking back as much used electronics as we can in line with our goal to reuse or recycle an equivalent product for each one sold. In fact, through our focus on accelerating the circular economy, we have recovered more than 2 billion pounds of used electronics since 2007. Refurbishment and reuse are a key part of how we ensure that devices stay out of the landfill and find new homes and continued use," explains Indrajit Belgundi, Senior Director and General Manager, Client Solutions Group, Dell Technologies, India.

When Dell takes back a device, the goal is always to refurbish and reuse, first. Dell Financial Services (DFS) program has helped the company support reuse. By leasing technology, when customers need to refresh or update devices, Dell takes them back in ideal condition to refurbish and pass on to a new customer. "Today 95% of the devices we get back from DFS customers are refurbished," adds Belgundi. However, if the device is no longer in working condition and cannot be refurbished, Dell dismantles the system, assess which parts can be put back into the supply chain to be used for other systems that can be refurbished. The remaining parts are responsibly recycled. For instance, plastic parts from the system can be turned into new plastic parts through Dell's closed-loop plastics supply chain. "To date, we have created well more than 100 million pounds of closed-loop plastic parts, used on more than 125 different product lines. Typically, more than 90% of a Dell product can be recycled," explains Belgundi.

It's not just refurbished but Dell has been using recycled material in its products as well as packaging. In January this year, Dell announced the new Latitude 5000 series and Precision 3560, which are made from bioplastic from tree waste. Produced using a by-product of a paper-making process called 'tall oil', these devices feature lids containing 21% bioplastic content. Dell's bioplastics are blended with recycled carbon fiber and other plastics for a total of 71% recycled or renewable materials in the lid of the Latitude 5000 series and Precision 3560.

Dell also uses a variety of combinations of recycled and renewable materials in packaging. For example, Dell's Latitude 9000 devices use 100% recycled material in 2-in-1 packaging trays (15% ocean-bound plastics + 75% HDPE). "We use renewable materials like bamboo, recycled paper pulp, 100% recycled plastic and ocean-bound plastic in our packaging. We are currently at 85%. We're aiming for 100% of our packaging to be made from recycled and renewable materials by 2040," adds Belgundi.

As part of our overall ambitions to advance sustainability, including recycled and renewable materials in products is a key priority for Dell. The company has set an ambitious moonshot goal that by the year 2030 for every product sold, Dell will recycle or reuse an equivalent product and 100% of Dell's packaging and half of the product portfolio will be made from recycled or renewable materials. For this Dell has recently joined Circular Electronics Partnership (CEP) alongside the biggest names in tech, consumer goods and waste management, which are committing to work together to accelerate the circular economy.

Also read: Foxconn, Wistron, Dell, Lava and 15 other firms apply for PLI investments

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